Maine ARES

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES)

From the ARRL "Public Service Communications Manual"

Chapter One: Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES)

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) consists of licensed amateurs who have
voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty in the
public service when disaster strikes. Every licensed amateur, regardless of membership in
ARRL or any other local or national organization, is eligible for membership in the ARES.
The only qualification, other than possession of an Amateur Radio license, is a sincere
desire to serve. Because ARES is an amateur service, only amateurs are eligible for
membership. The possession of emergency-powered equipment is desirable, but is not a
requirement for membership.

1.1 ARES Organization

There are four levels of ARES organization--national, section, district and local. National
emergency coordination at ARRL Headquarters is under the supervision of the ARRL Field and
Educational Services Manager, who is responsible for advising all ARES officials regarding
their problems, maintaining contact with federal government and other national officials
concerned with amateur emergency communications potential, and in general with carrying out
the League's policies regarding emergency communications.

1.2 Section Level

At the section level, the Section Emergency Coordinator is appointed by the Section Manager
(who is elected by the ARRL members in his or her section) and works under his/her
supervision. In most sections, the SM delegates to the SEC the administration of the
section emergency plan and the authority to appoint District and local ECs. Some of the ARRL
sections with capable SECs are well-organized. A few have scarcely any organization at all.
It depends almost entirely on who the section members have put into office as SM and whom
he/she has appointed as SEC.

1.3 Local Level

It is at the local level where most of the real emergency organizing gets accomplished,
because this is the level at which most emergencies occur and the level at which ARES
leaders make direct contact with the ARES member-volunteers and with officials of the
agencies to be served. The local EC is therefore the key contact in the ARES. The EC is
appointed by the SEC, usually on the recommendation of the DEC. Depending on how the SEC
has set up the section for administrative purposes, the EC may have jurisdiction over a
small community or a large city, an entire county or even a group of counties. Whatever
jurisdiction is assigned, the EC is in charge of all ARES activities in his area, not just
one interest group, one agency, one club or one band.

1.4 District Level

In the large sections, the local groups could proliferate to the point where simply
keeping track of them would be more than a full-time chore, not to mention the idea of
trying to coordinate them in an actual emergency. To this end, SECs have the option of
grouping their EC jurisdictions into logical units or "districts" and appointing a District
EC to coordinate the activities of the local ECs in the district. In some cases, the
districts may conform to the boundaries of governmental planning or emergency-operations
districts, while in others they are simply based on repeater coverage or geographical
boundaries.

1.5 Assistant ECs

Special-interest groups are headed up by Assistant Emergency Coordinators, designated by
the EC to supervise activities of groups operating in certain bands, especially those
groups which play an important role at the local level, but they may be designated in any
manner the EC deems appropriate.

1.6 Planning Committee

These assistants, with the EC as chairman, constitute the local ARES planning committee
and they meet together from time to time to discuss problems and plan projects to keep
the ARES group active and well-trained.

There are any number of different situations and circumstances that might confront an
EC, and his/her ARES unit should be organized in anticipation of them. An EC for a small
town might find that the licensed amateur group is so small that appointing assistants is
unnecessary or undesirable. On the other hand, an EC for a large city may find that even
his assistants need assistants and that sometimes it is necessary to set up a special
sub-organization to handle it. There is no specific point at which organization ceases
and operation commences. Both phases must be concurrent because a living organization is
a changing one, and the operations of a changing organization must change with the
organization.

1.7 Operation and Flexibility

We have discussed how a typical ARES unit may be organized. Just what shape the plan in
your locality will take depends on what your EC has to work with. He/she uses what he/
she has, and leaves provision in the plan for what he/she hopes, wants and is trying to
get. Flexibility is the keynote. The personnel, equipment and facilities available today
may not be available tomorrow; conversely, what is lacking today may be available tomorrow.
In any case, bear in mind that organizing and planning are not a one-person task. The EC
is simply the leader, or, as the title indicates, the coordinator. His/her effectiveness
inevitably will depend on what kind of a group he/she has to work with; that is, on you
and your cohorts. Make yourself available to your EC as a member of his planning committee,
or in any capacity for which you think you are qualified.

Local ARES operation will usually take the form of nets--HF nets, VHF (repeater) nets, even
RTTY, packet or other special-mode nets, depending on need and resources available. Your EC
should know where your particular interests lie, so that you can be worked in where your
special talents will do the most good.

It is not always possible to use the services of all ARES members. While it is general
policy that no ARES member must belong to any particular club or organization to participate
in the program, local practical considerations may be such that you cannot be used. This is
a matter that has to be decided by your EC. In some cases, even personality conflicts can
cause difficulties; for example, the EC may decide that he cannot work with a particular
person, and that the local ARES would be better served by excluding that person. This is
a judgment that the EC would have to make; while personality conflicts should be avoided,
they do arise, more often than we would prefer. The EC on the job must take the
responsibility for making such subjective evaluations, just as the SEC and DEC must
evaluate the effectiveness of the job being done by the EC.

1.8 ARES Operation During Emergencies and Disasters

Operation in an emergency net is little different from operation in any other net, requires
preparation and training. This includes training in handling of written messages--that is,
what is generally known as "traffic handling." Handling traffic is covered in detail in the
ARRL Operating Manual. This is required reading for all ARES members--in fact, for all
amateurs aspiring to participate in disaster communications.

The specifications of an effective communication service depend on the nature of the
information which must be communicated. Pre-disaster plans and arrangements for disaster
communications include:

** Identification of clients who will need Amateur Radio communication services.
** Discussion with these clients to learn the nature of the information which they will
need
to communicate, and the people they will need to communicate with.
** Specification, development and testing of pertinent services.

While much amateur-to-amateur communicating in an emergency is of a procedural or tactical
nature, the real meat of communicating is formal written traffic for the record. Formal
written traffic is important for:

** A record of what has happened--frequent status review, critique and evaluation.
Completeness which minimizes omission of vital information.
** Conciseness, which when used correctly actually takes less time than passing informal
traffic.
** Easier copy--receiving operators know the sequence of the information, resulting in
fewer errors and repeats.

When relays are likely to be involved, standard ARRL message format should be used. The
record should show, wherever possible:

  1. A message number for reference purposes.
  2. A precedence indicating the importance of the message.
  3. A station of origin so any reply or handling inquiries can be referred to that station.
  4. A check (count of the number of words in the message text) so receiving stations will
know whether any words were missed.
  1. A place of origin, so the recipient will know where the message came from (not
necessarily the location of the station of origin).
  1. Filing time, ordinarily optional but of great importance in an emergency message.
  2. Date of origin.
The address should be complete and include a telephone number if known. The text should be
short and to the point, and the signature should contain not only the name of the person
sending the message but his title or connection also, if any.

Point-to-point services for direct delivery of emergency and priority traffic do not
involve relays. Indeed, the full ARRL format is often not needed to record written traffic.
Shortened forms should be used to save time and effort. For example, the call sign of the
originating station usually identifies the place of origin. Also, the addressee is usually
known and close by at the receiving station, so full address and telephone number are often
superfluous. In many cases, message blanks can be designed so that only key words, letters
or numbers have to be filled in and communicated. In some cases, the message form also
serves as a log of the operation. Not a net goes by that you don't hear an ARL Fifty or an
ARL Sixty One. Unfortunately, "greetings by Amateur Radio" does not apply well during
disaster situations. You may hear an ARL text being used for health and welfare traffic,
but rarely during or after the actual disaster. Currently, no ARL text describes the wind
speed and barometric pressure of a hurricane, medical terminology in a mass casualty
incident or potassium iodide in a nuclear power plant drill. While no one is suggesting
that an ARL text be developed for each and every situation, there is no reason why amateurs
can't work with the local emergency management organizations and assist them with more
efficient communications.

Amateurs are often trained and skilled communicators. The emergency management community
recognizes these two key words when talking about the Amateur Radio Service. Amateurs must
usetheir skills to help the agencies provide the information that needs to be passed, while
at the same time showing their talents as trained communicators who know how to pass
information quickly and efficiently. We are expected to pass the information accurately,
even if we do not understand the terminology.

Traffic handlers and ARES members are resourceful individuals. Some have developed other
forms or charts for passing information. Some hams involved with the SKYWARN program, for
instance, go down a list and fill in the blanks, while others use grid squares to define
a region. Regardless of the agency that we are working with, we must use our traffic-handling
skills to the utmost advantage. Sure, ARL messages are beneficial when we are passing
health and welfare traffic. But are they ready to be implemented in times of need in your
community? The traffic handler, working through the local ARES organizations, must develop
a working relationship with those organizations who handle health and welfare inquiries.
Prior planning and personal contact are the keys to allowing an existing National Traffic
System to be put to its best use. If we don't interface with the agencies we serve, the
resources of the Amateur Radio Service will go untapped.

Regardless of the format used, the appropriate procedures cannot be picked up solely by
reading or studying. There is no substitute for actual practice. Your emergency net should
practice regularly--much more often than it operates in a real or simulated emergency. Avoid
complacency, the feeling that you will know how to operate when the time comes. You won't,
unless you do it frequently, with other operators whose style of operating you get to know.

Taille Haie

Si vous avez une haie sur votre propriété qui semble avoir été traînée pendant l'hiver, vous aurez besoin de plus d'une paire de ciseaux pour régler les choses et un taille-haie vous fera économiser beaucoup d'efforts et de temps .

Les options d'électricité, de batterie et d'essence sont toutes disponibles, mais ce dont vous avez besoin dépendra du fait que vos haies sont à la portée d'une rallonge de la maison ou situées aux bords de votre propriété.

Pour obtenir la bonne machine pour vos besoins, vous devrez également considérer leur épaisseur, leur hauteur et leur largeur et, en fin de compte, leur quantité.

Quelle que soit la puissance de votre taille-bordures, les résultats devraient toujours être les mêmes - et votre outil devrait être capable d'apprivoiser les haies les plus rebutantes sans être constamment coincé ou accroché et coupé proprement afin qu'une nouvelle croissance saine soit promue une fois que vous avez terminé le travail.

Taille-haie Husqvarna 115iHD45: € 207, Husqvarna

Il s'agit d'une machine très conviviale avec un démarreur à clavier à bouton-poussoir intelligent, qui vous permet également de choisir entre un mode de puissance maximale, pour traverser des sections de haie plus épaisses, ou un mode économique pour une coupe légère pour maximiser la durée de vie de la batterie 36V .

La batterie a pris un peu plus d'une heure pour se charger à 100%, ce qui nous a donné 25 minutes d'autonomie entre les deux modes et la lame de 45 cm était un match facile pour toute couverture d'épaule. Compte tenu de la puissance de la machine, il y avait très peu de bruit, ce qui rend le modèle idéal pour les jardins urbains, vous pouvez donc commencer tôt sur ces haies indisciplinées sans ennuyer les voisins. Husqvarna a également réussi à maintenir le poids, vous pouvez donc vraiment le jeter. La batterie et le chargeur sont inclus dans le prix.

Taille-haie Honda HHH25S 75: € 399, Just Lawnmowers

Si vous avez plus de haies à affronter qu'un jardinier de Hampton Court, ce modèle de taille haie à lame unique à essence est idéal. Il offre de réels avantages si vous avez beaucoup de longues haies droites à affronter, car il offre une énorme lame de 72 cm qui coupe une plus grande bande en un seul balayage. La lame unique le rend également beaucoup plus facile à utiliser que les autres modèles à essence car il économise du poids et il est équipé d'un collecteur de détourage, ce qui peut vous faire économiser beaucoup de travail éreintant en ramassant les coupures par la suite.

Taille-haie sans fil Ego Power Plus HT5100E: 199 €, Ego

Pour une machine alimentée par batterie, cela offre une puissance réelle à portée de main sans le bruit et l'agitation d'un équivalent essence. La lame de 51 cm propulsée par une haie dense comprenant des branches et des tiges plus épaisses, grâce à la lame en acier découpée au laser et au diamant et au sélecteur à deux vitesses signifie que vous pouvez économiser de la batterie lorsque la coupe est plus facile. Nous avons obtenu 35 minutes de temps de travail de la batterie 2AH, mais vous devrez débourser un autre € 124,98 pour la batterie et le chargeur, ce qui est compatible avec le reste de la gamme d'outils de jardin EGO.

Bosch AHS 45-16: € 64.99

Si vous coupez près de votre propriété et que vous avez des haies à hauteur de poitrine qui ne sont pas composées de grosses pousses, cette tondeuse à cordon les gardera sous contrôle grâce à une lame substantielle de 45 cm et à la possibilité de poursuivre votre tâche sans avoir à vous soucier du remplissage des réservoirs ou du chargement des batteries. Confortable et léger, avec des positions de poignée bien conçues.

Taille-haie Gtech HT20: 149,99 €, Gtech

Cette machine bénéficie d'un coupe-poteau très léger avec une tête de coupe facilement réglable qui pivote de 135 degrés. Cela en fait l'outil parfait pour lutter contre les arbustes en forme de colonne qui sont autonomes ou plantés ensemble pour créer une bordure. Des lames de coupe efficaces se combinent à 45 minutes d'autonomie pour laisser suffisamment de temps pour ranger les arbustes et toute couverture. Vous pouvez également le rendre plus polyvalent en ajoutant des accessoires de coupe-branche et de coupe-herbe ou un poteau d'extension qui ajoutera 50 cm de portée supplémentaire.

Taille-haie sans fil Bosch AHS 50-20 LI: 116,95 €,

Cette machine vraiment légère est livrée avec une batterie 18V et un chargeur et sa durée de vie d'une heure signifie qu'elle est parfaitement adaptée à un jardin de taille moyenne. La lame de 50 cm a fait un excellent travail pour s'attaquer aux haies petites à moyennes, avec quelques tiges épaisses dans la croissance, sans avoir à parcourir deux fois la même zone. Les coupes étaient propres, nous n'avons donc subi aucun arrêt ni bourrage pendant le travail et le protecteur de pointe de lame a évité de s'inquiéter d'endommager les lames lors de la coupe près des murs du jardin.

Taille-haie télescopique sans fil Stihl HLA 85: 345 €, World Of Power

Cette tondeuse sans fil au lithium-ion est longue portée et n'a eu aucun problème à gérer nos hautes haies d'un mètre de large en haut, grâce à une tête réglable qui s'incline à 115 degrés. Le poteau télescopique s'étend sur plus de trois mètres, vous n'aurez donc aucun problème à décapiter une bordure tout en gardant les pieds fermement sur le sol et la machine a beaucoup de puissance pour couper les branches plus épaisses invisibles qui accrocheraient les machines moins importantes. Bien conçu et équilibré avec une autonomie impressionnante de plus de deux heures, ce qui signifie que vous pouvez vous promener loin de chez vous sans avoir à vous soucier de manquer de jus. La batterie coûte 126 €.

Taille-haie longue portée Eckman: 89,99 €, Eckman

Si vous avez des haies hautes plus proches de chez vous, cette tondeuse filaire vous donnera une extension impressionnante de 2,8 m, tout en gardant le poids avec un arbre en aluminium et l'absence de réservoir d'essence ou de batterie. Une laisse électrique de 10 m vous donnera encore beaucoup d'espace pour vous déplacer avant de devoir ajouter une rallonge et la lame de 45 cm, qui s'étend sur 140 degrés, est plus qu'un match pour la couverture de boîte et de troène.

Taille-haie filaire Flymo Easicut 610Xt: 75 €, Argos

Il s'agit d'une tondeuse à cordon bien conçue, parfaite pour les petits jardins avec un mélange de couverture haute et basse. Son bel équilibre entre la lame et le boîtier rend la machine facile à déplacer sous la forme d'un arc classique, de haut en bas sur le côté d'une haie, avec la lame de 60 cm maximisant le balayage de coupe. Les deux poignées moulées permettent d'atteindre des haies hautes en tournant la machine verticalement et en changeant la position des mains.

Taille-haie sans fil Stihl HSA 66: 345,50 €, Garden Machinery Direct

Un autre modèle à démarrage facile, fonctionnant sur batterie avec une lame de 50 cm très efficace qui a produit des coupes de cisaillement et nettes à travers une gamme d'épaisseurs. L'outil n'a pas perdu de temps pour s'attaquer à la valeur d'un grand jardin d'arbustes et de haies. La batterie fournie nous a donné bien plus d'une heure d'autonomie, ce qui serait plus que suffisant pour un plus grand jardin. Si vous avez besoin de plus de temps, il vous suffit de 90 minutes pour que la batterie soit à nouveau à 100%.

Husqvarna 122HD60: 279 €, Husqvarna

La lame de 59 cm maximise votre balayage de coupe sans affecter l'équilibre de la machine, elle est donc confortable à utiliser et vous vous sentez toujours en contrôle. Très silencieux pour une machine à essence et les vibrations ont été réduites au minimum grâce à certains amortisseurs efficaces. Une poignée arrière réglable facilite également la taille des côtés et des haies et ne nous a pas fait sentir que nous venions de faire un entraînement des bras lorsque nous avions terminé.

Taille-haie sans fil Makita DUH523Z: 79,95 €,

Fonctionnant sur une batterie au lithium-ion, nous avons réussi à tirer près de deux heures de travail de ce modèle, qui a rapidement coupé à travers les branches de haie plus grandes tandis que la poignée caoutchoutée a réduit les vibrations du moteur. La lame de 52 cm permet une coupe efficace dans les grands balayages, mais parce que la machine est légère, elle a également bien fonctionné au niveau des yeux lorsque nous avions besoin d'effectuer des coupes plus précises et une mise en forme. La batterie et le chargeur peuvent également être récupérés sur pour 81,19 €

Le verdict: les taille-haies

Avec la combinaison parfaite de puissance, d'efficacité et de facilité d'utilisation, la Husqvarna 115iHD45 est une machine vraiment polyvalente et d'un excellent rapport qualité / prix car elle peut faire face à toutes sortes de haies dans les jardins de ville ou de campagne.

Si vous êtes ourlé avec une couverture élevée, le Stihl HLA 85 offre la meilleure solution pour couper les côtés et les dessus sans avoir la corvée supplémentaire de mettre en place des échelles et des plates-formes. Et, enfin, le Flymo easicut 610Xt mérite une mention si vous avez un budget modeste et une gamme de couvertures hautes et basses à affronter.

Mission

The Goal of Maine ARES is to develop trained, qualified amateur radio operators, familiar with many modes of communications and trained in the basic elements of emergency communications as well as the specific needs of the agencies; and to provide a structure through which amateur radio operators can be of service to their communities.

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) was established by the American Radio Relay League to provide a cadre of amateur radio operators trained and ready to provide essential communications to the communities in which we all live. Initally, hams generally were the local experts in communications and could respond to situations with the knowledge that they had more equipment and expertise than those to whom they were providing aid. Training beyond that required to become a licensed amateur radio operator was not needed. That has changed.

With the communications technology explosion of the past 20 years, and the proliferation of cell phones, spread spectrum, and readily available satellite communications, to mention a few of the technologies available to our communities, our need for specialized training and education has increased dramatically if we are to be of use to the agencies and communities we wish to serve. The introduction of words and phrases such as Weapons of Mass Destruction, Chemical and Bio Terrorism, and Hazmat Incidents to everyday usage in the American lexicon is a reminder that the world we live in today is far different than our grandparent's world. Likewise the usefulness of the untrained and unaware amateur radio operator wishing to provide emergency services has diminished to the point that if we have no training beyond that required for our license we will be viewed as a casualty waiting to happen when we respond to an emergency. Granted, the untrained amateur can find a place in community service providing communications for canoe races, bicycle races and parades. In fact these are excellent training venues for us to become familiar with our equipment capabilities and limitations, to learn how to operate within the structure of a net, and to learn some of our own limitations. Moreover, participation in these types of events allow us to support our communities and to repay our society for our privilege to operate our radios and to use the natural resource of our radio spectrum.

The sophistication of our served agency communications infrastructures also makes them more vulnerable to attack and failure. Also, these systems are expensive and many of our communities and agencies cannot afford to have all the equipment they know they need. Consequently, the need for us to be ready to provide trained, reliable volunteers and communications has increased, rather than decreased over the years. Our communities are waiting for us to respond as trained, professional communicators, because in fact, we are amateurs only because we do not and cannot be paid for our services. We are no different than our volunteer firefighters or emergency medical personnel. We expect a fireman to have received training if he or she is to protect our homes, and none of us want an untrained EMT to respond to our ambulance call. Like us,many of these people are volunteers. Our level of expertise and abilitiy to communicate effectively has to be that of a trained professional if we are to be of assistance in emergencies.

The mission of Maine ARES is to provide supplemental, backup
communications support during times of disaster or emergency to
various emergency and disaster relief organizations in Maine, such
as Maine Emergency Management Agency (MEMA), the various county
EMA departments, the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army,
the National Weather Service, hospitals, etc..

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service is open to any licensed
Amateur Radio operator who has a sincere desire to serve his or
her county and community in times of disaster or emergency.
Although possessing backup power capabilities is not a requirement
for membership in ARES, it is highly desirable. Registration with
ARES indicates that you and your equipment may be available if a
disaster or emergency strikes Maine.

The Goal of Maine ARES is to develop trained, qualified amateur
radio operators, familiar with many modes of communications and
trained in the basic elements of emergency communications as well
as the specific needs of the agencies; and to provide a structure
through which amateur radio operators can be of service to their
communities.

The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) was established by the
American Radio Relay League to provide a cadre of amateur radio
operators trained and ready to provide essential communications
to the communities in which we all live. Initially, hams
enerally were the local experts in communications and could
respond to situations with the knowledge that they had more
equipment and expertise than those to whom they were providing aid.
Training beyond that required to become a licensed amateur radio
operator was not needed. That has changed.

With the communications technology explosion of the past 20 years,
and the proliferation of cell phones, spread spectrum, and readily
available satellite communications, to mention a few of the
technologies available to our communities, our need for
specialized training and education has increased dramatically if
we are to be of use to the agencies and communities we wish to
serve. The introduction of words and phrases such as Weapons of
Mass Destruction, Chemical and Bio-Terrorism, and Hazmat Incidents
to everyday usage in the American lexicon is a reminder that the
world we live in today is far different than our grandparent's
world. Likewise the usefulness of the untrained and unaware
amateur radio operator wishing to provide emergency services has
diminished to the point that if we have no training beyond that
required for our license we will be viewed as a casualty waiting
to happen when we respond to an emergency. Granted, the untrained
amateur can find a place in community service providing
communications for canoe races, bicycle races and parades. In
fact these are excellent training venues for us to become familiar
with our equipment capabilities and limitations, to learn how to
operate within the structure of a net, and to learn some of our
own limitations. Moreover, participation in these types of events
allow us to support our communities and to repay our society for
our privilege to operate our radios and to use the natural
resource of our radio spectrum.

The sophistication of our served agency communications
infrastructures also makes them more vulnerable to attack and
failure. Also, these systems are expensive and many of our
communities and agencies cannot afford to have all the equipment
they know they need. Consequently, the need for us to be ready to
provide trained, reliable volunteers and communications has
increased, rather than decreased over the years. Our communities
are waiting for us to respond as trained, professional
communicators, because in fact, we are amateurs only because we do
not and cannot be paid for our services. We are no different than
our volunteer firefighters or emergency medical personnel. We
expect a fireman to have received training if he or she is to
protect our homes, and none of us want an untrained EMT to respond
to our ambulance call. Like us, many of these people are
volunteers. Our level of expertise and ability to communicate
effectively has to be that of a trained professional if we are to
be of assistance in emergencies.

Staff

MAINE SECTION MANAGER
N1KAT Bill Woodhead
63 First St.
Auburn, ME 04210
(207) 782-4862
Email: n1kat[at]arrl.org

ASST. SECTION MANAGERS
WA1YNZ Wilburn (Scotty) Scott
PO Box 425
Crouseville, ME 04738
(207) 455-8333
Email: wa1ynz[at]ainop.com

KA1TKS Roger Dole
852 Bog Rd.
Hermon, ME 04401
Email: dolerw[at]juno.com

SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR
N1KGS Max Soucia
PO Box 724
Caribou, ME 04736
(207) 227-7748 (24/7 phone)
Email: n1kgs[at]arrl.net

MAINE RACES DIRECTOR
KA1RFD Rod Scribner
RR 4 Box 6770
Gardiner, ME 04345
582-1034
Email: ka1rfd[at]juno.com

MILITARY LIASON
Harry L. Marsters II, CMSgt, USAF
National Emergency Communications Manager/AFN1EC
USAF MARS
Currently TDy

DISTRICT EMERGENCY COORDINATOR

SOUTHERN MAINE
K1GAX Bryce Rumery
75 Ocean House Rd
Cape Elizabeth, ME 04107
Home Phone: (207) 799-1116
Work Phone: (207) 774-0051 x129
Cell Phone: (207) 650-5999
Pager: (207) 750-6110
Email: k1gax[at]juno.com

COUNTY EMERGENCY COORDINATORS

ANDROSCOGGIN
N1OXA,Ivan Lazure
115 Old Lisbon Road
Lewiston,Me 04240
(207) 784-0350
Email: n1oxa[at]arrl.net

AROOSTOOK
(open) Contact N1KGS above

CUMBERLAND
N1PS Peter Sturdivant
7 Pond View Rd
Standish, ME 04084
(207) 642-7840
Email: n1ps[at]arrl.net

FRANKLIN
(open) Contact N1KGS above

HANCOCK
W1GHS, Wayne Snow
PO Box 346
Sullivan, ME 04664
(207) 422-3362
Email: w1ghs[at]arrl.net

KENNEBEC
N1REX, Richard (Chief Beau) Beausoleil
292 Howe Road
Whitefield, ME 04353
(207) 549-5393
Email: n1rex[at]arrl.net

KNOX
Open (Contact N1KGS or K1GAX above)

LINCOLN
K2LOT, John Peters
154 Boothbay Rd
Edgcomb, ME 04556
(207) 882-7439
Email: k2lot[at]prexar.com

OXFORD
N1GZB, Bradley T. Saunders
797 Buckfield Rd.
Hebron, ME 04238-9734
Home: 207-966-3653
Pager: 207-750-3292
Email: n1gzb[at]arrl.net

PISCATAQUIS
KC1AU, Bob Wilson
PO Box 243
Monson, ME 04464
Office: (207) 564-8660
Pager: (207) 851-8891
Cell: (207) 343 8882
Email: kc1au[at]midmaine.com

PENOBSCOT
K1ONY, Al Cormier
6H Birch Hill Estates
Bangor, ME 04401
Email: k1ony[at]arrl.net

SAGADAHOC
WA1SCS, Alan Kuong
10 Winterfrost Drive
Brunswick, ME 04011
Email; wa1scs[at]arrl.net

SOMERSET
N1LRM Bob Wright Sr.
95 Troy Rd
Detroit, ME 04929
Email: n1lrm[at]arrl.net

WALDO
WE1MD Robin Staebler, MD
144 Head of the Tide Rd
Belfast Maine 04915
(207) 338-2860
Email: we1md[at]arrl.net

WASHINGTON
KB1HXC Kenneth (Skip) Colson Jr.
PO Box 346
Sullivan, ME 04664
(207)454-2156
Email: kb1hxc[at]arrl.net

YORK
WB1CIM, Larry LaTulip (RACES)
328 Federal St.
Waterboro, ME 04087
Email: wb1cim[at]sacoriver.net

Training Opportunities

One of the most important parts of emergency communications is training. It is not enough for us to "just communicate" anymore. Our served agencies expect us to know how they do business and be prepared to immediately serve without additional training when disaster strikes. It is recommended, as a minimum, that all Maine ARES members complete the following courses:

Click on the course listings to learn more:

Introduction to Emergency Communications

AND

Maine Emergency Communications Course Level I

AND

Maine Emergency Communications Course Level II

OR

Emergency Communications Courses EC-001 and EC-002

OR

Maine Emergency Communications Course, Level III

AND

FEMA Introduction to the Incident Command System (IS-100)
Click here for a written summary of the course

AND

An Introduction to the National Incident Management System (IS-700)
Click here for a written summary of the course

For ARES Leadership Officials
(AECs, OESs, Group Supervisors and Team Leaders)

Basic Incident Command Course (IS-200)
Click here for a written summary of the course

For ARES Management Officials
(DECs and ECs)

Maine ARES Leadership Course

ICS-300 Intermediate Incident Command System Course

An Introduction to the National Response Framework (IS-800)
Click here for a written summary of the course

Maine Emergency Communications Course Level I
AND
Maine Emergency Communications Course Level II
OR
ARRL Emergency Communications Courses EC-001 and EC-002
AND
FEMA Introduction to the Incident Command System (IS-100)
American Red Cross Introduction to Disaster Services (ARC 3066)
ADDITIONAL TRAINING COURSES
MAINE ARES
Maine ARES Leadership Course
FEMA
Introduction to Hazardous Materials (IS-5)
Are You Ready? An In Depth Guide to Citizen Preparedness (IS-22)
Basic Incident Command Course (IS-200)
The Role of Volunteer Agencies in Emergency Management (IS-288)
Disaster Basics (IS-292)
Introduction to Community Emergency Response Teams (IS-317)
The National Incident Management System (IS-700)
AMERICAN RED CROSS
American Red Cross Damage Assessment (ARC 30671)
American Red Cross Standard First Aid and Adult CPR

Additional Courses

Maine ARES Safety Course

The following are courses offered on-line from the Maine Emergency Management Training Center

To take these courses (and others) you must register with me to get a user name and password. This will give you full access to to the courses listed below and others on the MEMTC site.

To register for these courses, send me an e-mail with your First and Last Name and your date of birth.

Register for Courses

Courses of interest
(Each module lasts between 10 and 75 minutes depending on the content)

State Communications Interoperability Program - Awareness Training
(1 module)

Community Emergency Response Team (9 modules)
Note that these are the classroon training modules for the CERT training. These do not replace the 20 hour CERT training course and practical exercises, but can be used as a refresher or to make up for classroom training missed.

WMD/Hazmat Awareness Training (5 modules)

Terrorism Prevention (2 modules)

Security Concepts (5 modules)

NIMS and ICS (10 modules)
2 modules for NIMS and 8 Modules for ICS-100

Nets

County Day Time Frequency
Statewide Sun 1630 3940 kHz
Skywarn Trng. Wed/Sat 2030/1930 KQ1L Linked System
Androscoggin 1st, 3rd, 4th Tue 1830 146.61 (-)
Aroostook Mon 2000 146.73 (-)
Cumberland Sun 1930 147.09 (+) (100.0 Hz)
Hancock 2nd Mon 1900 147.465 (simplex)
Kennebec Sun 1900 145.39 (-) (100.0 Hz)
Lincoln Sun 1900 146.985 (-)
Oxford 2nd, 3rd, 4th Mon 2000 146.88 (-) (100.0 Hz)
Penobscot 2nd & 4th Wed 1900 146.94 (-) (100.0 Hz)
Sagadahoc Mon 1930 147.21 (+) (100.0 Hz)
Somerset Mon 1930 146.73 (-) (91.5 Hz)
St. John Valley Mon 1700 146.64 (-) (100.0 Hz)
Tri County ARES Sun 2000 KQ1L Linked System
Waldo 2nd, 3rd 4th Mon 1930 147.27 (+) (136.5 Hz)
Washington Thu 1900 147.33 (+) (118.8 Hz)

Maine ARES Email Reflector!

The Maine ARES Email Reflector is an electronic mailing list where list members can
e-mail (post) information, a question or comment and it is automatically
distributed via e-mail to everyone who is subscribed to the mailing list.

This moderated e-mail list has been established for the purpose of exchanging information
on emergency communications, meeting and event notices, asking technical questions and the
like regarding emergency communications in Cumberland County and in the Southern Maine
District. You will find this reflector is a valuable online communication tool for
ARES members.

All ARES members with an e-mail address are invited to subscribe to the reflector.
It is a great way to communicate with the membership between Section ARES meetings. You can
now use a simple web form to subscribe to the reflector, unsubscribe from the reflector,
and set your personal preferences.

To post to this list, send your email to: maineares[at]mailman.qth.net

General information about the mailing list (and to subscribe) is at:
mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/maineares

You can also make such adjustments via email by sending a message to:
Maine ARES-request[at]mailman.qth.net, and you will get back a message with instructions.

You must know your password to change your options (including changing the password, itself)
or to unsubscribe.

If you forget your password, don't worry, you will receive a monthly reminder telling you what
all your mailman.qth.net mailing list passwords are, and how to unsubscribe or change your
options. There is also a button on your options page that will email your current password
to you.

You may also have your password mailed to you automatically off of the Web page noted above.

If you are not sure how to use the Mailman interface please look at the FAQ located at
mailman.qth.net/faq.htm prior to asking questions. Most common problems are covered.

Please note: You must subscribe to the e-mail reflector to receive e-mail updates for
Maine ARES.

Maine ARES Links

Emergency Communications

Served Agencies

Disaster Information